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The Greens'History

 
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Evelyne
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PostPosted: Sun 2 Sep - 14:04 (2012)    Post subject: The Greens'History Reply with quote

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There is a widely shared albeit arguably mistaken view that ‘ecological’ or ‘green’ political thought is of relatively recent vintage, being a product of the political turbulence of the 1960s and 1970s which saw the emergence of die Grünen in Germany and green parties in Britain and France, the publication of important environmental exposés and warnings, and symbolised by the first Earth Day in 1970. But modern green thought is older still, representing a confluence of several different streams of thought and sensibility. Some have detected the first stirrings of environmental concerns as early as the sixteenth century (Thomas 1984). Others trace the first glimmerings of a green sensibility to Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the Romantic movement, with their acute appreciation of mountains, dark forests and wild nature. Others find the first stirrings of an ‘ecological’ perspective in the writings of the young Marx, with his vision of the symbiotic interdependence of man and nature (Parsons 1977). Or, more broadly, one might take note of the ecological emphases of German thinkers since the time of Goethe who, with his holistic, anti-reductionist view of nature, so greatly influenced not only German Romanticism but the biological sciences, as well as later German greens such as Rudolf Bahro and Petra Kelly. British environmental thinking was spurred by reactions to the industrial revolution, with its ‘dark satanic mills’ threatening to overtake the green countryside, and has also been greatly influenced by such Romantic nature-poets as William Wordsworth and by the naturalist Charles Darwin, amongst others whose thinking has influenced modern British greens

http://histories.cambridge.org/extract?id=chol9780521563543_CHOL97805215635…
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The Australian Greens is a confederation of eight state and territory parties which grew out of Australian environment movements in the 1970s and 1980s. The campaign to save Lake Pedder led to the formation of the United Tasmania Group in 1972. This was the first 'green party' in the world.

The 1980s were a time of enormous growth and professionalism in green movements, resulting in the election of Australia’s first green member of parliament. In 1984 a national conference was called and Greens parties were formed in Queensland and New South Wales. The NSW Greens stood candidates in the 1984 state election. In the same year Jo Vallentine was elected to the Senate for Western Australia as a member of the Nuclear Disarmament Party, before leaving to form her own. In 1990 this group merged with others to form the WA Greens.

Throughout the 1980s forest campaigns in Western Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania strengthened and developed the green movement. At the end of the decade, the Wesley Vale Pulp Mill campaign saw three more Greens (Christine Milne, Di Hollister and Lance Armstrong) elected to the Tasmanian Parliament in 1989. With Bob Brown and Gerry Bates (who had been elected in 1986) they formed an alliance called The Green Independents. They held the balance of power, and the ALP governed with their support as a minority government until 1992.

The 1990s began with serious efforts to form a national Green political party. By the end of 1992, both the Australian Greens and a Victorian Greens party were established. In the national parliament, Jo Vallentine retired in 1992 and Christobel Chamarette filled her WA Greens Senate seat. In the 1993 federal election another WA Greens senator, Dee Margetts, was elected to the Senate, and she and Christobel Chamarette held the balance of power.

The new century brought increasing promise. The 2001 federal election saw Bob re-elected in the Senate for Tasmania and joined by Kerry Nettle for New South Wales. In a federal by-election in 2002, Michael Organ from Illawarra, NSW, became the first Greens member of the House of Representatives, but he lost the seat at the next general election.

In 2004, the Greens increased their Senate representation to four when Bob Brown and Kerry Nettle were joined by Christine Milne from Tasmania and Rachel Siewert from Western Australia.

At the 2007 Federal election, more than a million Australians voted Green. Bob Brown was resoundingly re-elected, but Kerry Nettle was not, despite an increase in her vote. Sarah Hanson-Young (SA) and Scott Ludlam (WA) joined Bob, Christine and Rachel in the Senate in July 2008.

At state level, the Greens have 23 elected members of parliament: five in Tasmania, four in New South Wales, four in the ACT, three in Victoria, five in Western Australia, and two in South Australia. More than 80 Greens have been elected to local councils around the country.

The Australian Greens is part of the Global Greens network, with around 70 Greens parties established world-wide. In 23 nations Greens have been elected to public office, and in European countries such as Germany, Latvia and France, Greens parties are part of governing coalitions. Find out more about the Global Greens at www.globalgreens.org

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Evelyne
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PostPosted: Sun 2 Sep - 14:17 (2012)    Post subject: The Greens'History Reply with quote

Japanese Greens launch new political party

Posted 9 August, 2012

Anti-nuclear demonstration outside the Japanese Diet



Looking to harness public opposition to nuclear power following the Fukushima catastrophe, Japanese citizens, anti-nuclear and environment groups have launched a new political party, Midori no To (Greens Japan). The party plans to field 10 candidates in the Upper House election scheduled for mid-2013 and intends to field candidates in the proportional representation bloc of Tokyo in the Lower House election, which must be held by late 2013. The Party's core policy is to substantially increase the use of renewable energy sources to end Japan's dependence on nuclear power and reduce carbon dioxide emissions. "I hope we can become a party that reflects the public's desire to abolish nuclear power," said Nao Suguro, a key figure and a member of the Suginami Ward Assembly in Tokyo. The party also opposes the export of nuclear power technology and Japan's possible entry into the Trans-Pacific Partnership free-trade negotiations. Instead Greens Japan is calling for an economy centered on local production and consumption, improved social security programs through fair sharing of tax burdens and increased participation in democratic processes.
The new party sprang from a political organization called Midori no Mirai (Green Future), comprising about 70 lawmakers in local assemblies and others. The organization was disbanded to form Greens Japan, with 1,000 members of Green Future joining the new party.
The launch of the new party was attended by Green Parliamentarians Bärbel Höhn from Germany and Scott Ludlum from Australia as well as representatives of Green parties in India, Taiwan and Korea. More news reports:
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